The Hotlo is Coming Home…

by Hans | October 22nd, 2012

After 50 years the last working Hotlo engine is coming home… This ship diesel engine from the Stork generation returns to the place where it was built 50 years ago… the city of Hengelo in The Netherlands.

The diesel is installed in the old drillingship, the ‘Noble Roger Eason’, at the (former Dutch Verolme) BrasFELS shipyard in Angra dos Reis near Rio de Janeiro. A huge operation to lift the heavy 400 ton motor from its chassis, since the Foundation Hotlo wants to show the engine operational in the Hengelo museum, the future ‘House of Innovation’.

Almost 200 of these engines were manufactured by the Stork factory. Back in the fifties Stork played an important role for the community of Hengelo. Many families and local subcontractors depended on jobs from Stork. Members of the Foundation Save our Stork Hotlo traced and found the last working Hotlo diesel in Brazil. Since 2009 they are committed to bring the Hotlo home. All members are passionate fans and some have special memories from the days they worked on a Hotlo-motorized ship.

Weeks of preparations to make the lifting of the engine from the vessel possible, are passed. Under supervision and close corporation with the Noble and Keppel companies, the BrasFELS cranes will lift the diesel engine from its position and prepare for the transport to the Netherlands. Finally… the moment arrived …

Chairman Cor Homans and member Ben Rodenburg witnessed the lifting of the engine from the old vessel at the shipyard.

See the youtube film here on http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Lwrgjjjvt4

The Youtube film is credit by Visuals Studio Brazil Rio de Janeiro Director / producer Ernst Daniel Nijboer infovisuals@gmail.com

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