The Galati Ten

by Hans | June 7th, 2010

 

THE GALATI TEN

 

         

DAMEN ASD 2810

 

 

                           The Galati Ten

A very strong and favourite design is the ASD 2810. The 60 ton bollard pull tugs are fitted with 2 Caterpillar 3516 series main engines driven two Rolls Royce Aquamaster Azimuth thrusters 

The 2810 stands for 28 meters long and 10 meter beam

Yard numbers are based on the contracts which were made to the Damen Shipbuilding Group in Gorinchem – Netherlands and started with 5115 followed by 2 digit numbers.

Below you read the success story of the 10 ASD 2810 built in a series on the Damen Galati Shipyard in Romania

These 10 tugs were all built by Damen for the famous tugboat company Smit International in Rotterdam

The building of these ten successful tugs took just 2 years in total. The first tug started to build in the spring of 2007. Steel plates were cutting and production was lined up. The last and tenth vessel was delivered to her owners on the 10th of August 2009.

The first two vessels were built according the standard type ASD 2810. The following vessels according the new generation type ASD 2810. This new type has more space on the fore deck due to a more compact superstructure.

The 10 tugs are named in two different types 6 of them are named after Caribbean Islands and 4 named after Rivers.

The Caribbean Island names are: Grenada; Trinidad; Martinique; Dominica; Saba and Guadeloupe.

The River names are: Hudson; Schelde; Seine and Ebro

The River classed vessels are build under the supervision of the Dutch Shipping Inspectorate – (Nederlandse Scheepvaart Inspectie)

The Smit Grenada; Smit Trinidad, Smit Martinique and Smit Dominica are build under Lloyd Register of Shipping Classification Society.

The Smit Hudson, Smit Schelde, Smit Saba, Smit Guadeloupe, Smit Seine and Smit Ebro are build under Bureau Veritas Classification Society

 

Standard ASD 2810

1. Smit Grenada

Grenada is an island nation and sovereign state consisting of the island of Grenada and six smaller islands at the southern end of the Grenadines in the southeastern Caribbean Sea. Grenada is located northwest of Trinidad and Tobago, northeast of Venezuela, and southwest of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines. Its size is 344 km² with an estimated population of 110,000. Its capital is St. George’s. The national bird of Grenada is the critically endangered Grenada Dove.

History

1498–1958: Colonization

The recorded history of Grenada begins in 1498. At the time the indigenous Island Caribs (Kalinago) who lived there called it Camahogne. The Spaniards did not permanently settle on Camahogne. Later the English failed their first settlement attempts, but the French fought and conquered Grenada from the Caribs circa 1650. The French conquest resulted in the genocide of 17th century Caribs from present-day Grenada. Warfare also existed between the Caribs of present day Dominica and St. Vincent and the Grenadines with the French invaders. The French took control of Camahogne and named the new French colony La Grenade. La Grenade prospered as a wealthy French colony; its main export was sugar. The French established a capital known as Fort Royal in 1650 as ordered by Cardinal Richelieu. To wait out harsh hurricanes, the French navy would shelter in the capital’s natural harbour. No other French colony had a natural harbour to even compare with that of Fort Royal (later renamed St. George’s). The colony was ceded to the United Kingdom in 1763 by the Treaty of Paris. A century later, in 1877 Grenada was made a Crown Colony.

  Liliana Micu with flowers

1958–1984: Independence and Revolution

The capital St. George’s, Grenada The island was a province of the short-lived West Indies Federation from 1958 to 1962. In 1967, Grenada attained the status of “Associated State of the United Kingdom”, which meant that Grenada was now responsible for her own internal affairs, and the UK was responsible for her defence and foreign affairs. Independence was granted in 1974 under the leadership of the then Premier, Sir Eric Matthew Gairy, who became the first Prime Minister of Grenada. Civil conflict gradually broke out between Eric Gairy’s government and some opposition parties including the New Jewel Movement (NJM). Gairy’s party won elections in 1976 but the opposition did not accept the result, accusing it of fraudulence. In 1979, the New Jewel Movement under Maurice Bishop launched a paramilitary attack on the government resulting in its overthrow. The constitution was suspended and Bishop’s government ruled subsequently by decree. Cuban presence was welcomed and heavily invested in civic assistance (doctors, teachers, and technicians in the fields of health, literacy, agriculture, and agroindustries) during the ensuing era. Agrarian reforms started by the Gairy government were continued and greatly expanded under the revolutionary government of Maurice Bishop.

  Building:

The building of the Smit Grenada started in 2007 and completed on the 15th February 2008. In just one year this tug was completed and delivered to her owners. The vessels sailed from Galati to the Caribbean were she is operated in the Panama area.

On the 10th of October 2007 she was lifted out of her building shed by yards gantry crane and set into the water. The launching ceremony was held by Godmother Mrs. Liliana Micu, wife of the ship coordinator Mr. Sorin Micu as seen on the picture above.

Characteristics:

The tug is one of the older generations with one fifi monitor and pump with a capacity of 600 m3/hr. On the fore deck is a single drum anchor towing winch fitted. On the aft deck is a single drum towing winch fitted with a 650 mtrs 48 mm towing wire. The bollards foreward are fitted in horizontal position.

General details:

The SMIT Grenada is the first tug for SMIT with this name. It means no history is available.

 

  Photo: Hans van der Ster

511531 – Smit Grenada (9396414)
  • Hull built in 2007 on the Damen Galati yard in Romania
  • Launched 08 October 2007 at the Galati Yard – Romania under yard number 1124 by Mrs. Liliana Micu, wife of the ship coordinator Sorin Micu.
  • Commissioned 15 February 2008 to Smit International (Curaçao) N.V. Bahama flag. c/s C6WY4. Mng. Virtual Logistic Marine Services Inc. – Panama for service in the Panama canal
  • Sailed 20 February 2008 from Galati – Romania to Colon – Panama under Redwise Maritime Services B.V. ownership and management
  • Redeliver in Colon – Panama by Redwise crew on 25 March 2008.
  • Operations area Panama
Specification:
  • Gross 294 t. Nett 88t.
  • Displacement 538 t.
  • Length o.a. 28,67 x Beam o.a. 10.43 x Draft sides  4.60 mtrs
  • Speed 13.3 kts.
  • Propulsion twin Caterpillar 3516B TA HD/C diesel engines, 3628 kW (4930 bhp)  – Aquamaster US205
  • Bollard pull 59.6 ton ahead – 55 ton astern
  • Class: LRS 

2. Smit Trinidad

Trinidad is the larger and more populous of the two major islands and numerous landforms which make up the country of Trinidad and Tobago. It is the southernmost island in the Caribbean and lies just 11 km (7 miles) off the northeastern coast of Venezuela. With an area of 4,768 km² (1,864 sq. mi.) it is also the sixth largest in the West Indies,

History

The history of Trinidad and Tobago begins with the settlements of the islands by Amerindians. Both islands were encountered by Christopher Columbus on his third voyage in 1498. Tobago changed hands between the British, French, Dutch and Courlanders, but eventually ended up in British hands. Trinidad remained in Spanish hands until 1797, but it was largely settled by French colonists. In 1888 the two islands were incorporated into a single crown colony. Trinidad and Tobago obtained self-governance in 1958 and independence from the British Empire in 1962. It became a republic in 1976

Contemporary Trinidad

Today Trinidad is the result of a fusion of many different cultures. It hosts an annual pre-Lenten Carnival. It is the birthplace of Calypso music, the Steelpan musical instrument and Limbo dance. Styles of popular music include Calypso, Chutney music, Soca and Parang.

Major landforms include the hills of the Northern, Central and Southern Ranges(Dinah ranges), the Caroni, Nariva and Oropouche Swamps, and the Caroni and Naparima Plains. Major river systems include the Caroni, North and South Oropouche and Ortoire Rivers. Native mammals include the Red Brocket Deer, Collared Peccary, Red Howler Monkey and the Ocelot. Trinidad has a rich avifauna, including a single endemic species, the Trinidad Piping Guan.

Trinidad is the second richest country in the Caribbean. It is an industrial island with a diversified economy, based to a large extent on oil and natural gas, industry and agriculture It is one of the leading gas-based export centers in the world, being the leading exporter of ammonia and methanol and among the top five exporters of liquefied natural gas. This has allowed Trinidad to capitalize on the large mineral reserves within its territories.

  Mrs Elena Canepa with ship coordinator Valeriu Hlibiciuc (photo: J.v.d.Ster)

Characteristics:

The tug is one of the older generations with one fifi monitor and pump with a capacity of 600 m3/hr. On the fore deck is a single drum anchor towing winch fitted. On the aft deck is a single drum towing winch fitted with a 650 mtrs 48 mm towing wire. The bollards foreward are fitted in horizontal position.

General details:

The SMIT Trinidad is the 2nd vessel for SMIT with this name. The first one was built as a supplier.

History:

The first SMIT Trinidad was built in 1975 as Broco Bird on the Patje (J) Waterhuizen Schipyards – Waterhuizen; Netherlands for K/S A/S Broco & Co. – Haugesund. In 1979 SMIT-Lloyd bought the vessel and renamed her SMIT-Lloyd 24. In 1984 she was transferred to SMIT Tak and renamed in SMIT Trinidad. The compiler of this article has sailed on this offshore support vessel as chief engineer in 1986

  SMIT Trinidad (1) 

511532 – Smit Trinidad (9396426)
  • Hull built in 2007 on the Damen Galati yard in Romania
  • Launched on 25 February 2008 by Mrs. Elena Canepa at the Damen Galati yard – Romania under yard number 1125
  • Commissioned 30 May 2008 to Smit Shipping Singapore Pvt.Ltd; Bahama flag. c/s C6XE7. Mng. SMIT Harbour Towage Liverpool – UK
  • Sailed 3 June 2008 from Galati – Romania to Liverpool by Transport & Offshore Services (TOS) crew
  • Change sailing orders 11 June 2008 to Antwerp – Belgium for Unie van Redding- en Sleepdienst – Antwerp as replacement for the Lieve Geveart.
  • Arrived 20 June 2008 in Antwerp.
  • Left 09 August 2008 Antwerp with Redwise crew via Kieler Channel to Kleipeda, Litanian
  • Arrived Kleipeda on 13 August 2008. Operations area Baltic
Specification:
  • Gross 285 t. Nett 88t.
  • Length  28.67 x Beam 10.43 x Draft  4.60 mtrs
  • Speed 13.5 kts.
  • Propulsion twin Caterpillar 3516B TA HD/C diesel engines, 3628 kW (4930 bhp)  – Aquamaster US205
  • Bollard pull 59 ton ahead – 55 ton astern
  • Class: LRS
Photo: Hans van der Ster

New generation tugs

The Damen range of tugs are constantly updated / upgraded as a result of experiences with earlier vessels. The “Smit Hudson” is the first ‘Next Generation’ ASD-2810 type tug.

The ‘new generation’ tug present has a more compact superstructure due to reorganization of the accommodation spaces. This, in turn, provides for extra deck space improving conditions on deck. Due to its exceptional qualities, this type is one of the most ordered products in the tug building market today.

The Damen-built Azimuthing Stern Drive tug 2810 is a highly manoeuvrable high performance tug of modern design. The propulsion consists of two main engines, electrically started and box cooled, with two steerable rudder propeller units with fixed pitch propellers in nozzles mounted in the aft ship. Due to the in-built operational flexibility the vessel can be used for harbour towing / shiphandling, coastal berthing operations and offshore towing. The vessel design allows for towing on the hook, for push-pull and for pushing operations.

For shiphandling services the vessel is equipped with a forward towing winch. The long distance between the towing point and the stern rudder propellers allows good manoeuvrability. Giving or taking a rope is simplified as the tug can go forward all the way-up to the vessel to be towed, give or take a rope and than pull away. Compared to the earlier 2810’s, more working space is available between the forward winch and the forward tow bitts facilitating the handling of the tow ropes. This was made possible by the shorter superstructure which allowed the forward winch to come aft a bit.

Although the vessel is mainly used in harbours, she is also suitable for service at sea. For this purpose the tug is equipped with a towing winch aft, as well as a towing bitt and towing hook. The arrangement of the fore and aft deck is designed to provide an unobstructed working area for the towline. The design of the vessel was made in close co-operation with the rudder propeller manufacturer and the research department of the yard.

The vessel features a compact superstructure on the forecastle deck with a bridge-deck placed wheelhouse, a large aft deck and a spacious fore deck. The superstructure and below-deck accommodation are designed to accommodate officers and crew for a total of 6 persons (which was 8 in the earlier boats). Compared to the earlier boats the Master’s cabin to starboard has been re-arranged. The C/E’s cabin was moved to below-maindeck accommodation. In this way space was cleared to shorten the superstructure but also to allow for the engine-room switchboard to be located in the deckhouse on this new generation tug. For operating in the Rotterdam area, the vessel is built and equipped for a 2 man operation.

The round-bilge hull has a transom stern and tapered bow. The transom corners are well rounded. The hull is made of class approved steel plates. The hull structures in the bow sections are adequately reinforced, in order to support the pushing and towing of ships without damaging the tug. Four bulkheads divide the hull in 5 watertight compartments. She has a length oa of 28,67 m, beam oa of 10,43 m and a depth at side of 4,60 m.

Fire-fighting gear is mainly optional, but a series of earlier 2810’s was fitted fitted with fire fighting gear for 600 cubm/hr. The new series of 2810’s is prepared for FiFi I class (2.400 cubm/hr). This will be fitted upon customer’s requirement.

Two sea-chests are integrated in the hull bottom construction in the engine room to house the box coolers for the cooling system. Each chest is provided with hinged gratings, flush with the bottom and sides.

The anchors are stowed in pockets, flush with the hull line. The rims of the anchor hawse pipes and the upper edge of the pipe are protected with round bar. Galvanized steel hawse pipe covers  secured with stainless steel chains are provided.

Along the main deck and forecastle deck a bulwark is provided with adequate freeing ports. The top of the bulwark is protected and reinforced with a thick walled steel pipe. Two bulwark doors are provided for, one to starboard and one to port. Two deck lockers are integrated in the aft bulwark. Mooring ports are fitted in the bulwark at both sides aft. The mooring ports are of cast iron. Two pneumatic bridge operated and two hand-operated tow line guard post are fitted in the holes in the aft bulwark. Facility for storing the two hand operated towing pins is provided on the inside of the bulwark.

The superstructure shows a compact deckhouse with funnels at the aft and a raised wheelhouse on top. The efficient lay-out offers an unobstructed view in all directions. The wheelhouse is designed to prevent damage when coming alongside. Two funnels are fitted aft of the wheelhouse, one at each side. These funnels contain the exhaust piping of the diesel engines and act as ventilation outlets. The ventilation opening can be closed with watertight covers. A stairway, at portside of the deckhouse and a staircase from the inside of the deckhouse offers access to the wheelhouse.

On the aft deck two hatches on raised coamings with central filling and de-aeration system for most tanks are fitted.

On the bow the lower fenders are formed by vertical W-type block fenders, secured by galvanized steel pins between robust flat bars. Hollow cylindrical fenders are mounted on the fore ship and aft ship at port and starboard side on main deck level, secured by hoisting type slings. The cylindrical fenders are housed in a plate shoe of heavy construction. The ends of the cylindrical fenders are tapered. A continuous D-type fender is fitted at the sides and the stern. The fender is fitted between flat bars, which are welded to the sheerstrake. On the foreship lugs are fitted for nine ‘log loader type’ heavy fender tyres. On the earlier boats the fendering at the stern was executed less heavy.

Double bollards are fitted on both sides at the fore and aft deck, amidships single bollards are placed. The fore ship bollards are fitted to the inside of the bulwark. The amidship bollards also acting as tow wire limiters. The double pole cross beam type towing bitt on the aft deck is welded to the deck construction. A cast steel fairlead is integrated in the towing bitt. The towing bitt on the fore castle deck is welded and integrated in the fore deck construction. Two vertically positioned bolted chrome steel rope fair leads (Smit-type) are integrated in the towing bitt. On the aft deck a flush gobeye is fitted. Also on the aft deck a disc type towing hook with pneumatic quick release device is fitted, which can be operated from inside the wheelhouse and from the main deck near the hook.

Further on the aft deck, between the towing bitt and the deckhouse, a heavy duty hydraulic towing winch is fitted, for long distance towing and as a back up for the fore winch. On the forecastle deck a heavy duty split drum hydraulic anchor / towing winch is fitted. The drum is split into two parts. One part of the drum will be used for the regular towing duties. The plus of this system is a safe operation in all circumstances and better performance of the vessel. When a wire breaks or is damaged, the other drum can immediately be used. Compared to earlier boats the difference in the winch system is that the current one is split drum compared to single drum, and the capacity to haul 30 tonnes compared to 18 tonnes at 11 m/min in the earlier vessels.

A foldable type steel mast for navigation lights and antennas is fitted at the aft side of the wheelhouse top deck. The mast is complete with lights brackets, yardarms, aerials, sheaves, flag lines etc. Electric wiring is led through the mast with stainless steel sockets. The mast can be lowered by a hydraulic system, controlled from the wheelhouse. A long-voyage mechanical securing system is fitted additionally. The mast is provided with a system for safe acces to the mast. This ‘handsfree’ system consist of a stainless steel safety cable connected with brackets to the mast, a safety sleeve which runs on the safety cable and follows ‘automatically’ the person accessing the mast, a carrier cable and a safety harness.

The two four-stroke 16-cylinder Caterpillar diesel engines are of the V type, turbocharged and aftercooled and equipped with an electronic engine management system which is integrated with an electronic controlled fuel injection system. Each engine developed an 1.839 kW ouput at 1.600 rpm which results in a bollard pull of 60 tonnes and a speed of 13,5 knots. The design and lay-out of the propulsion installation is in accordance with Builder’s Standards and with the relevant rules of the classification society and are such that permanent attendance in the engine room is not required. Each marine diesel engine drives a rudder propeller installation with fixed propeller in a propeller nozzle via a shaft with flexible coupling and clutch. For the shaft arrangement both torsional and lateral vibration analysis is performed to avoid resonance in the working speed range. SB and PS propellers have opposite inward direction of rotation to create maximum performance. Start and stop of the main and auxiliary engines is in the engine room as well as on the bridge. The main engines are resiliently installed on top plates, which are welded on the longitudinal bottom girders. A flexible coupling is installed between the engine and intermediate shaft.

The engine speed is electronically operated from the wheelhouse control desk with one combi-type handle for each main engine. One control station is arranged in the front of the wheelhouse, with a split-type desk, in which all the propulsion controls are fitted. The control-desk is provided with two control handles, one for each propulsion unit, tachometers displaying main engines and propeller rpm, thrust / rpm direction indicators for PS and SB propeller units, emergency steering controls, alarm panels, selector switches for wheelhouse / engine room control, start / stop / emergency stop main engines and generators as well as the navcom controls and displays.

The generator set consists of a generator with built-in auto voltage regulator. The generators are driven each by a Caterpillar type 3056T marine diesel engine  to produce 105 kVa. The engines are electrical started and stopped from a control panel mounted on the engine.

The engine room is fitted out with two electrically-driven centrifugal general service pumps of the self priming type.  A bilge water separator forms part of the bilge water system. An independent diesel driven fire-fighting pump with hose and nozzle is fitted in the stern locker at PS aft bulwark. The toilets are flushed with fresh water, which is supplied with a fresh water pressure set. The drainage of washbasins, showers, toilets flows into the sewage tank or into the sewage plant. Separate black and grey water piping is fitted.

The wheelhouse and deckhouse accommodation has mechanical ventilation. The engine room has mechanical ventilation through air ducts, in the bulkhead and funnels of the deck house. Two electrically driven ventilators are fitted in the deckhouse aft bulkhead ventilation ducts and provide fresh air for ventilation of the engine room and air supply for the engines. Dust filters are fitted in the engine room ventilation inlet ducts. An air condition / heating system is installed in the ventilation system.

The vessel is suited to accommodate 6 persons in four cabins. One single-bed Master’s cabin with bathroom, one single-bed chief engineer cabin with bathroom and two cabins for two crew each with separate bathroom are provided. All cabins are equipped with air conditioning and heating systems. To achieve low noise levels in the accommodation floating floors and Dampa ceilings were fitted, in addition to the resiliently mounted engines.

The mess room has two dining tables with corner settee and two chairs suitable for 8 persons. It is equipped with a TV and radio set. The galley has a stainless steel work top, with cupboard underneath and small wall type lockers. A stainless steel combined refrigerator / freezer, a marine type electric cooker with four hotplates, an electric oven and a microwave were fitted.

Unique is the switchboard room on this new generation ASD 2810 tug located on the main deck and equipped with switchboard and alarm panel of the engine room equipment. The wheelhouse is equipped with the most modern navigation equipment such as river and sea radar, magnetic and satellite compass connected to the auto pilot. GPS navigator, Electronic chart system, AIS, Echosounder, VHF radiotelephones, SSB radiotelephone, Navtex, Barometer, Sound power telephone, intercom. Two wheelhouse-controlled searchlights are fitted on top of the wheelhouse.

This new generation tug is really a unique tug built for operation in big ports, for harbour duties as well as terminal activities.

3. Smit Hudson

The Hudson River is a 315-mile (507 km) river that flows from north to south through eastern New York. It rises at Lake Tear of the Clouds, on the slopes of Mount Marcy in the Adirondack Mountains, flows past Albany, and finally forms the border between New York City and New Jersey at its mouth before emptying into Upper New York Bay. Its lower half is an estuary, experiencing tidal influence as far north as Troy. The river is named for Henry Hudson, an Englishman sailing for the Dutch East India Company, who explored it in 1609.

The Hudson River was observed by Italian explorer Giovanni da Verrazano in 1524 as he became the first European historically known to have entered Upper New York Bay.

Early European settlement of the area clustered around the Hudson. The area inspired the Hudson River School of painting, an American pastoral style.

Names

The names of the Hudson River make a complicated story. It was called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk, the Great Mohegan, by the Iroquois, or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck.

Mrs Catalina Mereuta with flowers

In the early days of European exploration the Hudson was known as the Mauritius River. This is said to be the name given it by Henry Hudson in honor of Prince Maurice of Nassau, but it is also said to be the name given by sixteenth-century European adventurers, explorers, and fishermen who knew it as River Mauritius, ‘The River of Mountains’.

The Hudson was named the “North River” by the Dutch, who called the Delaware River the “South River.” The name “North River” was used in the New York City area up until the early 1900s, with limited use continuing into the modern day. The term persists in radio communication among commercial shipping traffic, especially below Tappan Zee.

It was the English who originated the use of the name “Hudson”—even though Hudson had found the river while exploring for the Dutch.

Characteristics:

The first tug of the new generation has no fifi installation due to operation area Rotterdam. On the fore deck is a double drums anchor towing winch fitted. On the aft deck is a single drum towing winch fitted with a 500 mtrs 48 mm towing wire. The bollards foreward are fitted is a bertical position. On the stern is a cylindrical fender fitted. On the stern bulwark there are pneumatic towing pins fitted. The vessels has a layout for a two men operation.

General details:

The name Hudson is not new in the Smit family. The company has owned four vessels in the past with this name: This vessel is the 5th vessel under the name “Hudson”.

History:

  • The 1st “Hudson” was an oceangoing steam tug built in 1894 as Titan for Amsterdam Tug & Salvage Company (Zur Múhlen) – Amsterdam. In 1919 she was bought by the Internationale Sleepdienst Maatschappij – Rotterdam and renamed in Hudson. However this tugboat Company was in that days not a part from Smit. In 1923 Smit and the Internationale joined together and started as Smit Internationale Sleepvaart Maatschappij. In the same year the Hudson was sold to Wijsmuller in Ijmuiden and renamed her Drente.

 Hudson (1) as Wijsmuller’s Drente  
  • The 2nd “Hudson, ” was an oceangoing steam tug also and built in 1918 as Lexmond. The Internationale Sleepdienst Maatschappij bought the tug in 1920 and renamed her Hudson. She joined the Smit family in 1923 after the fusion with Smit. In 1930 she was sold to Frence and renamed Gysbert. The tug had a Triple expansion engine of  450 hp.
  • The 3rd “Hudson” was an oceangoing Salvage Motor Tug built in 1939 on the yards of Piet Smit in Rotterdam. This tug sailed during World War II under the Dutch flag. And rescued a lot of vessels during that years. In 1962 she was renamed Ebro due to the new Hudson which was under construction. In 1963 before the arrival of the new Hudson she was sold and renamed Dirk Jan. The new owner converted her into an Icefactory for the fishery. Later she was sold to an other owner and renamed Elizabeth. In 1989 she was sold for scrap, however some enthoausiast tugboat lovers bought the vessel and renamed her Hudson again. Nowadays she is a Museum Ship with main principals to show how the seaman lives on board of the ships during WWII.  The main engine, a two stroke 5 cylinder Burmeister & Wain, is unfortunately lost.

 Hudson (3)
  • The 4th “Hudson” was an oceangoing Salvage Tug built in 1964. On this tug the compiler of this article has sailed for one trip, 6 months as 2nd engineer. In 1982 transferred to Smit International South East Asia. In 1984 sold for demolition She had an engine output of  4000 hp.

 Hudson (4)

 511535 – Smit Hudson (9402421)
  • Hull built in 2007 on the Damen Galati yard in Romania
  • Launched 1 March 2008 by Godmother Mrs Catalina Mereuta, wife of ship coordinator Nelu Mereuta. She is the first ship of the new generation ASD 2810 tug built here in Galatz.
  • Delivered 28 July 2008 to SMIT Shipping Singapore Prv. for operations by SMIT Harbour Towage Co. at Rotterdam. And under management of SMIT Vessel Management Rotterdam BV.
  • Sailed on 4th August 2008 from Galati to Constanta for bollard pull test.
  • Sailed on 5th August 2008 from Constantza – Romania with Redwise crew to Rotterdam. Bahama flag c/s C6XH8.
  • Arrived on 21st August 2008 in Rotterdam. Operations area Rotterdam
Specification:
  • Gross 285 t. Nett 85t.
  • Length  28.75 x Beam 9.80 x Draft  4.60 mtrs
  • Speed 13.5 kts.
  • Propulsion twin Caterpillar 3516B TA HD/C diesel engines, 3628 kW (4930 bhp)  – Aquamaster US205
  • Bollard pull 60.1 ton ahead.
  • Class: BV
 Photo Hans van der Ster

 4. Schelde

The Scheldt (Dutch: Schelde, French Escaut, Latin Scaldis) is a 350 km long river in northern France, western Belgium and the southwestern part of the Netherlands. Its name is derived from an adjective corresponding to Old English sceald “shallow”, Modern English shoal, Low German schol, Frisian skol, and Swedish skäll “thin”.

The headwaters of the Scheldt are in Gouy, in the Aisne department of northern France. It flows north through Cambrai and Valenciennes, and enters Belgium near Tournai. In Ghent, where it receives the Lys, its main tributary, the Scheldt turns east. Near Antwerp, the largest city on its banks, the Scheldt flows west into the Netherlands towards the North Sea.

Originally there were two branches from that point: the Oosterschelde (Eastern Scheldt) and the Westerschelde (Western Scheldt) but in the 19th century the river was cut off from its eastern (actually: northern) branch by a dyke that connects Zuid-Beveland with the mainland (North Brabant). Today the river therefore continues into the Westerschelde estuary only, passing Terneuzen to reach the North Sea between Breskens in Zeeuws Vlaanderen and Vlissingen (Flushing) on Walcheren.

The Scheldt is an important waterway, and has been made navigable from its mouth up to Cambrai. The port of Antwerp, the second largest in Europe, lies on its banks. Several canals (including the Albert Canal) connect the Scheldt with the basins of the Rhine, Meuse and Seine, and with the industrial areas around Brussels, Liège, Lille, Dunkirk and Mons.

The Scheldt flows through the following departments of France, provinces of Belgium, provinces of the Netherlands and towns:

Godmother Mrs Gabriella Apostolache secretary quality office & Ship coordinator Razvan Ionescu (photo: Hans van der Ster) 

Characteristics:

The tug is from the new generation and has no fifi installation due to operation area Rotterdam. On the fore deck is a double drums anchor towing winch fitted. On the aft deck is a single drum towing winch fitted with a 500 mtrs 48 mm towing wire. The bollards foreward are fitted is a bertical position. On the stern is a cylindrical fender fitted. On the stern bulwark there are pneumatic towing pins fitted. The vessels has a layout for a two men operation.

General details:

The name Schelde is a historical and very famous name for the Smit family. The company has owned six vessels in the past with this name: This vessel is the 7th vessel under the name “Schelde”.

History:

  • The 1st “Schelde” was a harbour steam tug and built in 1870. One year later in 1871 she was renamed “Bij” and was in service till 1920. She had a 150 hp engine.
  • The 2nd “Schelde” was an oceangoing steam tug built in 1906 and sold in 1915 to Sweden subs. Germany. Without change in name  she sailed till 1920. She sank after striking a mine. The tug had a Triple expansion engine of 1000 hp.

 Schelde (2)
  • The 3rd “Schelde”  was built in 1910 and purchased in 1919 from  Amsterdam Tug & Salvage Company (Zur Múhlen) – Amsterdam. In 1925 during very bad weather she grounded at the New Waterway entrance during a salvage with the loss of 8 crew members. She had a Triple Expansion Engine of 950 hp.

 Schelde (3) 
  • The 4th “Schelde”  was an oceangoing steam tug built in 1926. This tug sailed during World War II under the Dutch Navy flag. She was broken up in 1954. She had a Triple Expansion Engine of 650hp only.

 Schelde (4) 
  • The 5th “Schelde” was an oceangoing diesel electric driven tugboat built in 1958. On this tug the compiler of this article started his career in December 1965. The tug was sold in 1976. She had an engine output of  2250 hp. Meanwhile she is supposed to have been scrapped in the USA.

 Schelde (5)  
  • The 6th tugboat for the company was a pusher tug and the first with the name “Smit Schelde” she was built in 1981 and bought in 1984. She sailed till 2002 under the Smit flag. Her engine output was 1450 hp.
 511536 – Smit Schelde (9402433)
  • Hull built in 2007 on the Damen Galati yard in Romania
  • Launched 22 April 2008 by Godmother Mrs Gabriella Apostolache secretary quality office Damen Galati.
  • Delivered 25 September 2008 to SMIT Shipping Singapore Prv. for operations by SMIT Harbour Towage Co. at Rotterdam. And under management of SMIT Vessel Management Rotterdam BV.
  • Sailed on 29th September 2008 from Galati – Romania with Redwise crew to Rotterdam. Bahama flag c/s C6XI6.
  • Arrived on 17 October 2008 in Rotterdam. Operations area Rotterdam
Specification:
  • Gross 285 t. Nett 85t.
  • Length  28.75 x Beam 9.80 x Draft  4.60 mtrs
  • Speed 13.6 kts.
  • Propulsion twin Caterpillar 3516B TA HD/C diesel engines, 3628 kW (4930 bhp)  – Aquamaster US205
  • Bollard pull 59.1 ton ahead and 56.2 tons astern.
  • Class: BV

 Photo Hans van der Ster  

5. Smit Martinique

Martinique is an island in the eastern Caribbean Sea, with a land area of 1,128 km2 (436 sq mi). It is an overseas department of France. To the northwest lies Dominica, to the south St Lucia. As with the other overseas departments, Martinique is also one of the twenty-six regions of France (being an overseas region) and an integral part of the Republic. As part of France, Martinique is part of the European Union, and its currency is the euro. Its official language is French, although many of its inhabitants also speak Antillean Creole (Créole Martiniquais). Martinique is pictured on all euro banknotes, on the reverse at the bottom of each note, right of the Greek ΕΥΡΩ (EURO) next to the denomination.

Characteristics:

The tug is from the new generation and has a fifi installation of 1200 m3/hr. with two monitors. On the fore deck is a double drums anchor towing winch fitted. On the aft deck is a single drum towing winch fitted with a 650 mtrs 48 mm towing wire. The bollards foreward are fitted in a horizontal position.

General details:

The SMIT Martinique is the first tug for SMIT with this name. It means no history is available.

Photo: Damen  11537 – Smit Martinique (9402445)
  • Hull built in 2007 on the Damen Galati yard in Romania.
  • Launched 21 June 2008 by Godmother Mrs Roxana Ionescu wife of ship coordinator Razvan Ionescu.
  • Delivered 14 November 2008 to SMIT Shipping Singapore Prv. for operations SMIT Terminals at Kuwait. And under management of SMIT Vessel Management Rotterdam BV.
  • Sailed on 18th November 2008 from Galati – Romania with SMIT Singapore crew to Kuwait. Bahama flag c/s C6XI6.
  • Arrived on 28 December 2008 in Dubai for conversion on the Damen Dubai / Albwardi Yard of the FiFi set with extending of second monitors.
  • Sailed on 8th January 2009 from Dubai to Kuwait.
  • Arrived 12th January 2009 in Kuwait.
  • Operations area Kuwait  
Specification:
  • Displacement 535 t.
  • Length o.a. 28,67 x Beam o.a. 10.43 x Draft sides  4.60 mtrs
  • Speed 13.5 kts.
  • Propulsion twin Caterpillar 3516B TA HD/C diesel engines, 3678 kW (4930 bhp) – Aquamaster US205
  • Bollard pull 59,4 ton ahead – 56.5 ton astern 
  • Class: LRS 

 6. Smit Dominica

Dominica, (French: Dominique) officially the Commonwealth of Dominica, is an island nation in the Caribbean Sea. To the north-northwest lies Guadeloupe, to the southeast Martinique. Its size is 754 square kilometres (291 sq mi) and the highest point in the country is Morne, which has an elevation of 1,447 metres (4,750 ft). The Commonwealth of Dominica has an estimated population of 72,500. The capital is Roseau.

Dominica has been nicknamed the “Nature Isle of the Caribbean” for its seemingly unspoiled natural beauty. It is the youngest island in the Lesser Antilles, still being formed by geothermal-volcanic activity, as evidenced by the world’s second-largest boiling lake. The island features lush mountainous rainforests, home of many very rare plant, animal, and bird species. There are xeric areas in some of the western coastal regions, but heavy rainfall can be expected inland. The Sisserou parrot, the island’s national bird, is featured on the national flag. Dominica’s economy is heavily dependent on both tourism and agriculture.

Christopher Columbus named the island after the day of the week on which he spotted it – a Sunday (‘Doménica’ in Italian) – which fell on November 3, 1493. In the next hundred years after Columbus’ landing, Dominica remained isolated, and even more Caribs settled there after being driven from surrounding islands as European powers entered the region. France formally ceded possession of Dominica to the United Kingdom in 1763. The United Kingdom then set up a government and made the island a colony in 1805. The emancipation of African slaves occurred throughout the British Empire in 1834, and, in 1838, Dominica became the first British Caribbean colony to have a legislature controlled by blacks. In 1896, the United Kingdom reassumed governmental control of Dominica, turning it into a crown colony. Half a century later, from 1958 to 1962, Dominica became a province of the short-lived West Indies Federation. In 1978, Dominica became an independent nation.

History:

In 1635 France claimed Dominica. Shortly thereafter, French missionaries became the first European inhabitants of the island. Carib incursions continued, though, and in 1660, the French and British agreed that both Dominica and St. Vincent should be abandoned. Dominica was officially neutral for the next century, but the attraction of its resources remained; rival expeditions of British and French foresters were harvesting timber by the start of the 18th century.

Largely due to Dominica’s position between Martinique and Guadeloupe, France eventually became predominant, and a French settlement was established and grew. As part of the 1763 Treaty of Paris that ended the Seven Years’ War, the island became a British possession. In 1778, during the American Revolutionary War, the French mounted a successful invasion with the active cooperation of the population. The 1783 Treaty of Paris, which ended the war, returned the island to Britain. French invasions in 1795 and 1805 ended in failure.

In 1763, the British established a legislative assembly, representing only the white population. In 1831, reflecting a liberalization of official British racial attitudes, the Brown Privilege Bill conferred political and social rights on free non-whites. Three Black people were elected to the legislative assembly the following year. Following the abolition of slavery, in 1838 Dominica became the only British Caribbean colony to have a Black-controlled legislature in the 19th century. Most Black legislators were smallholders or merchants who held economic and social views diametrically opposed to the interests of the small, wealthy English planter class. Reacting to a perceived threat, the planters lobbied for more direct British rule.

In 1865, after much agitation and tension, the colonial office replaced the elective assembly with one that had one-half of members who were elected and one-half who were appointed. Planters allied with colonial administrators out maneuvered the elected legislators on numerous occasions. In 1871, Dominica became part of the Leeward Island Federation. The power of the Black population progressively eroded. Crown Colony government was re-established in 1896. All political rights for the vast majority of the population were effectively curtailed. Development aid, offered as compensation for disenfranchisement, proved to have a negligible effect.

Following World War I, an upsurge of political consciousness throughout the Caribbean led to the formation of the Representative Government Association. Marshalling public frustration with the lack of a voice in the governing of Dominica, this group won one-third of the popularly elected seats of the legislative assembly in 1924 and one-half in 1936. Shortly thereafter, Dominica was transferred from the Leeward Island Administration and was governed as part of the Windwards until 1958, when it joined the short-lived West Indies Federation.

After the federation dissolved, Dominica became an associated state of the United Kingdom in 1967 and formally took responsibility for its internal affairs. On November 3, 1978, the Commonwealth of Dominica was granted independence by the United Kingdom.

Independence did little to solve problems stemming from centuries of economic underdevelopment, and in mid-1979, political discontent led to the formation of an interim government. It was replaced after the 1980 elections by a government led by the Dominica Freedom Party under Prime Minister Eugenia Charles, the Caribbean’s first female prime minister. Chronic economic problems were compounded by the severe impact of hurricanes in 1979 and in 1980.

In 1981 Dominica was threatened with a takeover over by mercenaries.

Attempted coup

In 1981, a group of right-wing “mercenaries” led by Mike Perdue of Houston and Wolfgang Droege of Toronto, attempted to overthrow the government of Eugenia Charles. The North America mercenary group was to aid ex-Prime Minister Patrick John and his Dominica Defense Force in regaining control of the island in exchange for control over the island’s future development. The entire plan failed and the ship hired to transport the men of Operation Red Dog never even made it off the dock as the FBI was tipped off. The self-titled mercenaries lacked any formal military experience and/or training and the majority of the crew had been misled into joining the armed coup by the con-man ringleader Mike Perdue. White supremacist Don Black was also jailed for his part in the attempt, which violated US neutrality laws.

Since the 1980s

By the end of the 1980s, the economy recovered, but weakened again in the 1990s due to a decrease in banana prices.

In the January 2000 elections, the Edison James United Workers Party (UWP) was defeated by the Dominican Labour Party (DLP), led by Roosevelt P. “Rosie” Douglas. Douglas died after only a few months in office and was replaced by Pierre Charles, who died in office in January 2004. Roosevelt Skerrit, also of the DLP, replaced Charles as Prime Minister. Under Prime Minister Skerrit’s leadership, the DLP won elections in May 2005 that gave the party 12 seats in the 21-member Parliament to the UWP’s 8 seats. An independent candidate affiliated with the DLP won a seat as well. Since that time, the independent candidate joined the government and one UWP member crossed the aisle, making the current total 14 seats for the DLP and 7 for the UWP.

 Mrs Jeannette van der Ster with flowers (photo: Hans van der Ster)

 Characteristics:

The tug is from the new generation and has a fifi installation of 600 m3/hr. with one monitor. On the fore deck is a double drums anchor towing winch fitted. On the aft deck is a single drum towing winch fitted with a 650 mtrs 48 mm towing wire. The bollard forewards are fitted in a horizontal position.

General details:

The SMIT Dominica is the first tug for SMIT with this name. It means no history is available.

511538 – Smit Dominica (9402457)
  • Hull built in 2007 on the Damen Galati yard in Romania
  • Launched 4th September 2008 by Godmother Mrs Jeannette van der Ster – Gruben wife of newbuild Superintendent Hans van der Ster
  • Delivered 6th February 2009 to SMIT Shipping Singapore Prv.
  • Sailed on 10th February 2009 from Galati – Romania with Transport & Offshore Service crew to Ventspils; Latvia. Bahama flag c/s C6XM9.
  • Arrived 16th February in Valetta – Malta to check some nautical equipment and main engine problems. Left same day to continue voyage.
  • Arrived 28th February in Scheurhaven – Rotterdam for some engine repairs.
  • Left 1st  March to continue voyage to Ventspils.
  • Arrived 4th March in Ventspils
  • Operation area Baltic
Specification:
  • Displacement 535 t.
  • Length o.a. 28,67 x Beam o.a. 10.43 x Draft sides  4.60 mtrs
  • Speed 13.5 kts.
  • Propulsion twin Caterpillar 3516B TA HD/C diesel engines, 3678 kW (4930 bhp) – Aquamaster US205
  • Bollard pull 59,4 ton ahead – 56.5 ton astern
  • Class: LRS

 Photo: Hans van der Ster

7. Smit Saba

Saba is the smallest island of the Netherlands Antilles. It consists largely of the potentially active volcano, Mount Scenery (877 m), the highest point of the Kingdom of the Netherlands.

Saba has a land area of 13 km² (5 sq. miles). At the 2001 Netherlands Antilles census, the population was 1,349 inhabitants, which means a population density of 104 inhabitants per km². In 2004 the population was estimated at 1,424 inhabitants.

Its current major settlements include The Bottom, Windwardside, Hell’s Gate and St. Johns. Despite the island’s Dutch affiliation, English is the principal language spoken on the island and has been used in its school system since 1986. The Netherlands Antillean guilder is the official currency, but the U.S. dollar is accepted everywhere on the island.

Saba is home to the Saba University School of Medicine, which was established by American expatriates in coordination with the Netherlands government. The school adds over 300 residents when classes are in session, and it is the prime educational attraction. A.M. Edwards Medical Center is the major provider of healthcare for local residents.

Saba is slated to become a special municipality within the country of the Netherlands, but the schedule for this transition has been delayed indefinitely.

History

The origin of the name “Saba” is believed to be a variant of Dutch for “shoe”, because the major industry of the island was shoemaking when visited by the Dominican monk Jean-Baptiste Labat in 1701. Another theory is that the island’s name is derived from the Arawak Indian word for “rock”, which was “siba”. Christopher Columbus is said to have sighted Saba on November 13, 1493, but did not land, as the island’s perilously rocky shores were a major deterrent to Columbus and his crew. In 1632 a group of shipwrecked Englishmen landed upon Saba; they stated they found the island uninhabited when they were retrieved by others. But there has been some evidence found indicating that Carib or Arawak Indians may have been on the island. In 1635 a stray Frenchman claimed Saba for Louis XIII of France and around the year 1640, the Dutch West India Company sent people from the neighboring island of St. Eustatius to colonize the island. These settlers were then in 1664 evicted to St. Maarten by Sir Henry Morgan, the notorious English buccaneer, on one of the very few occasions that the nearly vertical rocky island was successfully invaded. The Netherlands finally took possession of Saba in 1816 after a spell of British occupation during the Napoleonic era.

Through the 17th and 18th centuries its major industries were sugar and rum, and, later, fishing, particularly lobster fishing. In the 1600s Saba was believed to be a favorable hideout for Jamaican pirates. England also deported its “undesirable” people to live in the Caribbean colonies. They too became pirates, taking haven on Saba. The most notable native Saban pirate was Hiriam Breakes, who famously quipped “Dead Men Tell No Tales.” Legitimate sailing and trade later became important and many of the island’s men took to the seas, during which time Saba lace became an important product made by the island’s women.

The remains of the 1640 settlements can be found on the west side at Tent Bay

Mrs Florina Marin with flowers Characteristics:

The tug is from the new generation and has a fifi installation of 600 m3/hr. with one monitor. On the fore deck is a double drums anchor towing winch fitted. On the aft deck is a single drum towing winch fitted with a 650 mtrs 48 mm towing wire. The bollard forewards are fitted in a horizontal position.

General details:

The SMIT Saba is the first tug for SMIT with this name. It means no history is available.

511543 – Smit Saba (9476379)
  • Hull built in 2008 on the Damen Galati yard in Romania
  • Launched 7th October 2008 by Godmother Mrs Florina Marin – Project cost controller Damen Galati Shipyard
  • Delivered 15th April 2009 to SMIT Shipping Singapore Prv.
  • Departed 17th April from Galati to Cristobal – Panama
  • Arrived 2nd May Las Palmas for bunkers
  • Departed 3rd May from Las Palmas to continue her voyage to Cristobal under Bahamas flag  with c/s C6XU5
  • Arrived 21st May in Cristobal – Panama
  • Operation area Panama
Specification:
  • Displacement 535 t.
  • Length o.a. 28,67 x Beam o.a. 10.43 x Draft sides  4.60 mtrs
  • Speed 13.5 kts.
  • Propulsion twin Caterpillar 3516B TA HD/C diesel engines, 3678 kW (4930 bhp) – Aquamaster US205
  • Bollard pull 60 ton ahead – 56.4 ton astern
  • Class: BV

Photo: Damen

8. Smit Guadeloupe

Guadeloupe:is an archipelago located in the eastern Caribbean Sea, with a land area of 1,628 square kilometres (629 sq. mi). It is an overseas department of France. As with the other overseas departments, Guadeloupe is also one of the twenty-six regions of France (being an overseas region) and an integral part of the Republic. As part of France, Guadeloupe is part of the European Union; hence, as for most EU countries, its currency is the euro However, Guadeloupe does not fall under the Schengen Agreement. The prefecture of Guadeloupe is Basse-Terre.

History:

During his second trip to America, seeking fresh water in November 1493, Christopher Columbus became the first European to land on Guadeloupe. He called it Santa María de Guadalupe de Extremadura, after the image of the Virgin Mary venerated at the Spanish monastery of Villuercas, in Guadalupe, Extremadura. The expedition set ashore just south of Capesterre but did not leave any settlers ashore.

Christopher Columbus is credited with discovering the pineapple on the island of Guadeloupe in 1493, although the fruit had long been grown in South America. He called it piña de Indes meaning “pine of the Indians.”

After successful settlement on the island of St Christophe (St Kitts), the French Company of the American Islands delegated Charles Lienard and Jean Duplessis, Lord of Ossonville to colonize one or any of the region’s islands, Guadeloupe, Martinique or Dominica. Due to Martinique’s inhospitable nature, the duo resolved to settle in Guadeloupe in 1635, took possession of the island and wiped out many of the Carib Amerindians. It was annexed to the kingdom of France in 1674. Over the next century, the island was seized several times by the British. The economy benefited from the hugely lucrative sugar trade introduced during the closing decades of the seventeenth century: one indication of Guadeloupe’s prosperity at this time is that in the Treaty of Paris (1763), France, defeated in war, agreed to abandon its territorial claims in Canada in return for British return of Guadeloupe which was captured in 1759.

In 1790, the upper classes of Guadeloupe refused to obey the new laws of equal rights for the free colored and attempted to declare independence, resulting in great disturbances; a fire broke out in Pointe-à-Pitre and devastated a third of the town, and a struggle between the monarchists (who wanted independence) and the republicans (who were faithful to revolutionary France) ended in the victory of the monarchists, who declared independence in 1791, followed by the refusal to receive the new governor appointed by Paris in 1792. In 1793, a slave rebellion started, which made the upper classes turn to the British and ask them to occupy the island. In an effort to take advantage of the chaos ensuing from the French Revolution, Britain attempted to seize Guadeloupe in 1794 and held it from 21 April until December 1794, when Victor Hugues obliged the English general to surrender. The French retook the island under the command of Victor Hugues, who succeeded in freeing the slaves. They revolted and turned on the slave-owners who controlled the sugar plantations, but when French interests were threatened, Napoleon sent a force to suppress the rebels and reinstitute slavery. Louis Delgrès and a group of revolutionary soldiers killed themselves on the slopes of the Matouba volcano when it became obvious that the invading troops would take control of the island. The occupation force killed approximately 10,000 Guadeloupeans in the process of restoring order to the island.

On 4 February 1810 the British once again seized the island. By the Anglo-Swedish alliance of 3 March 1813, it was ceded to Sweden but the British administration continued in place while Swedish commissioners were sent to make arrangements for the transfer. Sweden already had a colony in the area, but then by the Treaty of Paris of 1814, ceded Guadeloupe once more to France. An ensuing settlement between Sweden and the British gave rise to the Guadeloupe Fund. French control of Guadeloupe was finally acknowledged in the Treaty of Vienna in 1815. Slavery was abolished on the island in 1848 at the initiative of Victor Schoelcher.

Today the population of Guadeloupe is mostly of African origin with an important European and Indian active population. Lebanese/Syrians, Chinese, and others.

On 22 February 2007 the island communes of Saint-Martin and Saint-Barthélemy were officially detached from Guadeloupe and became two separate French overseas collectivities with their own local administration, henceforth separated from Guadeloupe. Their combined population was 35,930 and their combined land area was 74.2 km² at the 1999 census. Guadeloupe thereby lost 8.5 percent of its population and 4.36 percent of its land area, based upon numbers from that census.

On 20 January 2009, an umbrella group of approximately fifty labour union and other associations known in the local Antillais Creole as the Liyannaj Kont Pwofitasyon (LKP) led by Elie Domota called for a 200 Euro ($260 USD) monthly pay increase for the island’s low income workers. The protesters have proposed that authorities “lower business taxes as a top up to company finances” to pay for the 200 Euro pay raises. Employers and business leaders in Guadeloupe have said that they cannot afford the salary increase. 

 Miss Cristina Vasiliu with flowers Characteristics:

The tug is from the new generation and has a fifi 1 installation of 2400 m3/hr. with two remote controlled monitors. On the fore deck is a double drums anchor towing winch fitted. On the aft deck is a single drum towing winch fitted with a 650 mtrs 48 mm towing wire. The bollards foreward are fitted in a horizontal position. On the stern is a cylindrical fender fitted.

General details:

The SMIT Guadeloupe is the first tug for SMIT with this name. It means no history is available.

511544 – Smit Guadeloupe (9476381)
  • Hull built in 2008 on the Damen Galati yard in Romania
  • Launched 24th January 2009 by Godmother Miss Cristina Vasiliu – Daughter of Head Hull Construction Tug & Workboats Damen Galati Shipyard
  • Delivered 29th May 2009 to SMIT Shipping Singapore Prv.
  • Departed 2nd June from Galati – Romania with a Redwise crew to Panama under Bahamas flag with c/s C6XU9
  • Arrived on 16th June Las Palmas for bunkers
  • Departed 17th June to continue her voyage to Cristobal – Panama
  • Arrived 5th July in Cristobal – Panama
  • Operation Area Panama
Specification:
  • Displacement 535 t.
  • Length o.a. 28,67 x Beam o.a. 10.43 x Draft sides  4.60 mtrs
  • Speed 13.5 kts.
  • Propulsion twin Caterpillar 3516B TA HD/C diesel engines, 3678 kW (4930 bhp) – Aquamaster US205
  • Bollard pull 60.5 ton ahead – 56.7 ton astern
  • Class: BV

 Photo: Damen

 9. Smit Seine

The Seine is a slow-flowing major river and commercial waterway within the regions of Île-de-France and Haute-Normandie in France and famous as a romantic backdrop in photographs of Paris, France. It is also a tourist attraction, with excursion boats offering sightseeing tours of the Rive Droite and Rive Gauche within the city of Paris. It terminates in the Bay of the Seine region of the English Channel and is navigable by oceanic transports about ten percent of its length to Rouen, 120 km (75 miles) from the sea, whereas over sixty percent of its length from Burgundy near the Swiss Alps is negotiable by commercial riverboats and nearly its whole length is available for recreational boating.

There are 37 bridges over the River Seine just within Paris and dozens more spanning the river outside of the city. Examples in Paris include the Pont Louis-Philippe and Pont Neuf, the latter which dates back to 1607. Outside of the city, examples include the Pont de Normandie, one of the longest cable-stayed bridges in the world, which links Le Havre to Honfleur.

The name “Seine” comes from the Latin Sequana, a Latinisation of the Gaulish (Celtic) Sicauna, which is argued to mean “sacred river”. Some have argued that Sicauna is cognate to the name of Saône River, though an argued relationship to the River Shannon in Ireland is unlikely, given the very different forms of the two; Gaelic an tSiona, dative Sionainn is rather from Prehistoric Irish *Sinona. Another proposal has it that Sequana is the Latin version of Gaulish Issicauna Lower-Icauna, which would be the diminutive of Icauna, which was the Gaulish name of the Yonne River. Some believe the ancient Gauls considered the Seine to be a tributary of the Yonne, which indeed presents a greater average discharge than the Seine (the river flowing through Paris would be called Yonne if the standard rules of geography were applied).

Some identify the river Sikanos, origin (according to Thucydides) of the Sicanoi of Sikelia (Sicily), with the river Sequana (Seine).

Further downstream in what is now Normandy, the Seine, the second longest river in France, was known as Rodo, or Roto, which is a traditional Celtic name for rivers, and is also the stem of the Rhône River (see Rhône article for further explanations). This is proved by the name of Rouen, which was Rotomagos in Gaulish, meaning “Roto-field/plain” (magos in Gaulish), whose meaning evolved into “market of the Roto”

Legend has it that after Joan of Arc was burned at the stake in 1431, her ashes were thrown into the Seine, though counter-claims persist into the present-day.

According to his will, Napoleon, who died in 1821, wished to be buried on the banks of the Seine, a request that was not granted.

In January 1910, the Seine flooded 20 feet above normal, drowning streets throughout the city of Paris and sending thousands of Parisians fleeing to emergency shelters. The 1910 Great Flood of Paris was the worst the city had seen since 1658 when the water reached only a few centimeters higher

Until the 1930s, a towing system using a chain on the bed of the river existed to facilitate movement of barges upriver.  Mrs. Gabriela Severin with flowers and husband

The Seine River was one of the original objectives of Operation Overlord in 1944. The Seine River is a very popular tourist attraction. The Allies’ intention was to reach the Seine by D+90 (ie 90 days after D-Day). That objective was met. An anticipated assault crossing of the river never materialized as German resistance in France crumbled by early September 1944. However, the First Canadian Army did encounter resistance immediately west of the Seine and fighting occurred in the Forêt de la Londe as Allied troops attempted to cut off the escape across the river of parts of the German 7th Army in the closing phases of the Battle of Normandy.

Some of the victims of the Paris massacre of 1961 drowned in the Seine after being thrown off from the Pont Saint-Michel and other locations in Paris.

Characteristics:

The tug is from the new generation and has no fifi installation due to operation area Rotterdam. On the fore deck is a double drums anchor towing winch fitted. On the aft deck is a single drum towing winch fitted with a 500 mtrs 48 mm towing wire. The bollards foreward are fitted in a vertical position. On the stern is a cylindrical fender fitted. On the stern bulwark there are pneumatic towing pins fitted. The vessel has a layout for a two men operation.

General details:

The SMIT Seine is the 2nd vessel for SMIT with this name. The first one was built in 1908.

History:

The 1st Seine was an Oceangoing Steam Tug and built in 1908 by the Rotterdamse Droogdok Maatschappij for the Internationale Sleepdienst Maatschappij – Rotterdam. Between 1914 and 1918 she was advanced by the Royal Dutch Navy. In 1923 she was brought in at the new joint venture Smit Internationale Sleeboot Maatschappij – Rotterdam. In 1946 she was sold for demolition. The tug has a Triple Expansion Steam Engine of 850 pk.

 Seine (1) 511545 – Smit Seine (9476393)
  • Hull built in 2008 on the Damen Galati yard in Romania
  • Launched 18th February 2009 by Godmother Mrs. Gabriela Severin wife of Damens Project Managers Tug & Workboat Mr. Cristian Severin Damen Galati Shipyard
  • Delivered 10 July 2009 to SMIT Shipping Singapore Prv.
  • Departed 28 Ocober 2009 under Bahama flag with c/s C6XY2
Specification:
  • Displacement 535 t.
  • Length o.a. 28,67 x Beam o.a. 10.43 x Draft sides  4.60 mtrs
  • Speed 13.6 kts.
  • Propulsion twin Caterpillar 3516B TA HD/C diesel engines, 3678 kW (4930 bhp) – Aquamaster US205
  • Bollard pull 60.2 ton ahead – 57.1 ton astern
  • Class: Bureau Veritas

 Photo: Hans van der Ster

10 Smit Ebro

The Ebro or Ebre or is Spain’s most voluminous river. Its source is in Fontibre (Cantabria). It flows through cities such as Miranda de Ebro, Logroño, Zaragoza, Flix, Tortosa, and Amposta before discharging in a delta on the Mediterranean Sea in the province of Tarragona.

Name

The Romans named this river Iber (Iberus Flumen), hence its current name but probably derives from the Greek Hèvros, Εβρος. Arguably the whole peninsula and some of the peoples living there were named after the river.

History:

In antiquity, The Ebro was used as the dividing line between Roman (north) and Carthaginian (south) expansions after the First Punic War. When Rome, fearful of Hannibal’s growing influence in the Iberian Peninsula, made the city of Saguntum (considerably south of the Ebro) a protectorate of Rome, Hannibal viewed this treaty as an aggressive action by Rome and used the event as the catalyst to the Second Punic War.

One of the earliest Cistercian monasteries in Spain, Real Monasterio de Nuestra Senora de Rueda (Royal Monastery of Our Lady of the Wheel), is located on the banks of the Ebro in Aragon. This edifice survives to the present intact, having been established in the year 1202 AD. The monastery is strongly connected to the Ebro, since it used one of the first large waterwheels established in Spain for the production of power. The monastery also diverted flow from the Ebro to create a circulating hydrological central heating system for its buildings.

The river Ebro was the initial starting ground of one of the most famous Republican offensives during the Spanish Civil War, in 1938. The offensive itself, known as the Battle of the Ebro, ended in defeat for the Republican forces, even though they enjoyed initial success in its first stages. However, they were not able to reach the desired objective of Gandesa.

 Mrs. Oana Carmen Popa with flowers

Characteristics:

The tug is from the new generation and has no fifi installation due to operation area Rotterdam. On the fore deck is a double drums anchor towing winch fitted. On the aft deck is a single drum towing winch fitted with a 500 mtrs 48 mm towing wire. The bollards foreward are fitted in a vertical position. On the stern is a cylindrical fender fitted. On the stern bulwark there are pneumatic towing pins fitted. The vessel has a layout for a two men operation.

 General details: The SMIT Ebro is the 3rd vessel for SMIT with this name. The first one was built in 1931.

History:

The 1st Ebro was an Oceangoing Steam Tug and built in 1931 by the Shipyards of Piet Smit in Rotterdam. Between 1939 and 1940 she was advanced by the Royal Dutch Navy. In 1958 she grounded during a salvage on the Dutch Coast. The tug had a Triple Expansion Steam Engine of 550 pk.

 Ebro (1) 

The 2nd Ebro was an Oceangoing Salvage Tug and built in 1939 as Hudson (see above history).

  Ebro (2) 511546 – Smit Ebro (9476408)
  • Hull built in 2008 on the Damen Galati yard in Romania
  • Launched 20th March 2009 by Godmother Oana Carmen Popa wife of Ship Coordinator Tug & Workboats Mr. Stefan Popa Damen Galati Shipyard.
  • Delivered 10 August 2009 to SMIT Shipping Singapore Prv.  
  • Departed from Galati 29 September 2009 under Bahama flag with c/s C6XZ2
Specification:
  • Displacement 535 t.
  • Length o.a. 28,67 x Beam o.a. 10.43 x Draft sides  4.60 mtrs
  • Speed 13.6 kts.
  • Propulsion twin Caterpillar 3516B TA HD/C diesel engines, 3678 kW (4930 bhp) – Aquamaster US205
  • Bollard pull 60 ton ahead – 56 ton astern
  • Class: Bureau Veritas

 Photo: Hans van der Ster

Herewith I want to address my special thanks for the hospitality during the 18 months stay on the Damen Shipyard Galati – Romania:

Director Tugs & Workboats Damen Romania:

Mr. Sicco Postma
Secretary Tugs & Workboats Dam,en Romania
Gabriela Bucur
Project Managers Tugs & Workboats Damen Romania
Mr. Ricardo Regosa
Mr. Cristian Severin
Mr. Cristian Patriche
Mr. Marius Grosu

Vessel coordinators Tugs & Workboats Damen Romania

Mr. George Cosnita
Mr. Dorin Angel
Mr. Razvan Ionescu
Mr. Stephan Popa
Mr. Nelu Merueta
Mr. Sorin Micu
Mr. Valeriu Hlibiciuc
Mr. Theodor Baiceanu
Damen Research and Damen Field Services Sponsor Ladies:
Mrs. Liliana Micu – SMIT Grenada
Mrs. Elena Canepa – SMIT Trinidad
Mrs Catalina Mereuta – SMIT Hudson
Mrs Gabriella Apostolache – SMIT Schelde
Mrs Roxana Ionescu – SMIT Martinique
Mrs. J.v.d.Ster-Gruben – SMIT Dominica
Mrs Florina Marin – SMIT Saba
Miss Cristina Vasiliu – SMIT Guadeloupe
Mrs. Gabriela Severin – SMIT Seine
Mrs. Oana Carmen Popa – SMIT Ebro
Classification Society Romania
Mr. Sorin Gheorghiu – Bureau Veritas
Mr. Emil Teodorov – Lloyd Register
Agent Sigma
Mr. Radu Sirbu

All Damen Galati Yard personal and personal of the Damen Shipyards Galati subcontractors

My special thanks to Mr. Coen Boudesteijn Damen Gorinchem for the permission of publishing this article.

Subcontractors

 All hydraulic driven towing winches and all hydraulic combined anchor towing winches delivered by:

 Heating, ventilation, air-conditioning and cooling (HVAC) systems are delivered and installed by:

HEINEN HOPMAN ENGINEERING BV

 The hydraulic systems for the winches are delivered and installed by:

 The pneumatic controls for all deck equipments are delivered and installed by:

 Two main- and two auxiliary engines for power systems are delivered and commissioned by:

 

Nautical and Navigation equipment delivered and installed by:

 

Both Azimuth thrusters for each vessel delivered and commissioned by:

 

 All electric power systems, lightning and supplies are installed by:

The complete accommodation, insulations and heat protections are installed by:

All vessel are painted with paint of International-AkzoNobel.Coatings

Towing wires, mooring ropes stretchers for all vessels are supplied by:

 

 

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6 Responses to “The Galati Ten”

  1. A.G.Gruben says:

    Hoi Hans,
    je hebt weer een knap stukje werk geleverd en ik ben dan ook erg trots op mijn zwager.
    Groet Ton.

  2. Joost Geerdink says:

    Leuk om de namen van de boten in historisch perspectief te zien.
    Erg leuk om te lezen.

    Groetjes,
    Joost

  3. Dirk Dijksman says:

    Leuk stukje Hans. Ook leuk om mijn foto van de “oude” Trinidad weer eens te zien.

    Groeten,
    Dirk

  4. Jelle Mulder says:

    Een heel mooi stukje werk Hans. Ik zelf heb ook nog es op de SL24 gevaren, maar dat was ook al weer jaren geleden. Groetjes van deze kant. Jelle

  5. Jan Plug says:

    Geweldig stukje historie Hans. Leuk om zo alles bij elkaar te hebben. Kunnen we zo uitprinten en achterin het Smit-boek plakken. Klasse.

    Groetjes,
    Jan.

  6. I am really impressed with your writing skills as well as with the layout on your blog. Is this a paid theme or did you customize it yourself? Anyway keep up the excellent quality writing, it’s rare to see a nice blog like this one today..

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